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Journal of Zhejiang University SCIENCE B 2008 Vol.9 No.10 P.802~810

http://doi.org/10.1631/jzus.B0860001


Fluorescent co-localization of PTS1 and PTS2 and its application in analysis of the gene function and the peroxisomal dynamic in Magnaporthe oryzae


Author(s):  Jiao-yu WANG, Xiao-yan WU, Zhen ZHANG, Xin-fa DU, Rong-yao CHAI, Xiao-hong LIU, Xue-qin MAO, Hai-ping QIU, Yan-li WANG, Fu-cheng LIN, Guo-chang SUN

Affiliation(s):  Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou 310021, China; more

Corresponding email(s):   jiaoyuwang1@gmail.com, fuchenglin@zju.edu.cn, sungc01@sina.com

Key Words:  Peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS), Peroxisomal localization, MGPEX6 gene, Magnaporthe oryzae


Jiao-yu WANG, Xiao-yan WU, Zhen ZHANG, Xin-fa DU, Rong-yao CHAI, Xiao-hong LIU, Xue-qin MAO, Hai-ping QIU, Yan-li WANG, Fu-cheng LIN, Guo-chang SUN. Fluorescent co-localization of PTS1 and PTS2 and its application in analysis of the gene function and the peroxisomal dynamic in Magnaporthe oryzae[J]. Journal of Zhejiang University Science B, 2008, 9(10): 802~810.

@article{title="Fluorescent co-localization of PTS1 and PTS2 and its application in analysis of the gene function and the peroxisomal dynamic in Magnaporthe oryzae",
author="Jiao-yu WANG, Xiao-yan WU, Zhen ZHANG, Xin-fa DU, Rong-yao CHAI, Xiao-hong LIU, Xue-qin MAO, Hai-ping QIU, Yan-li WANG, Fu-cheng LIN, Guo-chang SUN",
journal="Journal of Zhejiang University Science B",
volume="9",
number="10",
pages="802~810",
year="2008",
publisher="Zhejiang University Press & Springer",
doi="10.1631/jzus.B0860001"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Fluorescent co-localization of PTS1 and PTS2 and its application in analysis of the gene function and the peroxisomal dynamic in Magnaporthe oryzae
%A Jiao-yu WANG
%A Xiao-yan WU
%A Zhen ZHANG
%A Xin-fa DU
%A Rong-yao CHAI
%A Xiao-hong LIU
%A Xue-qin MAO
%A Hai-ping QIU
%A Yan-li WANG
%A Fu-cheng LIN
%A Guo-chang SUN
%J Journal of Zhejiang University SCIENCE B
%V 9
%N 10
%P 802~810
%@ 1673-1581
%D 2008
%I Zhejiang University Press & Springer
%DOI 10.1631/jzus.B0860001

TY - JOUR
T1 - Fluorescent co-localization of PTS1 and PTS2 and its application in analysis of the gene function and the peroxisomal dynamic in Magnaporthe oryzae
A1 - Jiao-yu WANG
A1 - Xiao-yan WU
A1 - Zhen ZHANG
A1 - Xin-fa DU
A1 - Rong-yao CHAI
A1 - Xiao-hong LIU
A1 - Xue-qin MAO
A1 - Hai-ping QIU
A1 - Yan-li WANG
A1 - Fu-cheng LIN
A1 - Guo-chang SUN
J0 - Journal of Zhejiang University Science B
VL - 9
IS - 10
SP - 802
EP - 810
%@ 1673-1581
Y1 - 2008
PB - Zhejiang University Press & Springer
ER -
DOI - 10.1631/jzus.B0860001


Abstract: 
The peroxisomal matrix proteins involved in many important biological metabolism pathways in eukaryotic cells are encoded by nucleal genes, synthesized in the cytoplasm and then transported into the organelles. Targeting and import of these proteins depend on their two peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS1 and PTS2) in sequence as we have known so far. The vectors of the fluorescent fusions with PTS, i.e., green fluorescence protein (GFP)-PTS1, GFP-PTS2 and red fluorescence protein (RFP)-PTS1, were constructed and introduced into Magnaporthe oryzae Guy11 cells. Transformants containing these fusions emitted fluorescence in a punctate pattern, and the locations of the red and green fluorescence overlapped exactly in RFP-PTS1 and GFP-PTS2 co-transformed strains. These data indicated that both PTS1 and PTS2 fusions were imported into peroxisomes. A probable higher efficiency of PTS1 machinery was revealed by comparing the fluorescence backgrounds in GFP-PTS1 and GFP-PTS2 transformants. By introducing both RFP-PTS1 and GFP-PTS2 into Δmgpex6 mutants, the involvement of MGPEX6 gene in both PTS1 and PTS2 pathways was proved. In addition, using these transformants, the inducement of peroxisomes and the dynamic of peroxisomal number during the pre-penetration processes were investigated as well. In summary, by the localization and co-localization of PTS1 and PTS2, we provided a useful tool to evaluate the biological roles of the peroxisomes and the related genes.

Darkslateblue:Affiliate; Royal Blue:Author; Turquoise:Article

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