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Journal of Zhejiang University SCIENCE B 2007 Vol.8 No.12 P.853~859

http://doi.org/10.1631/jzus.2007.B0853


Quantitative analysis of a panel of gene expression in prostate cancer—with emphasis on NPY expression analysis


Author(s):  Liu Ai-jun, Furusato Bungo, Ravindranath Lakshmi, Chen Yong-mei, Srikantan Vasanta, Mcleod David G., Petrovics Gyorgy, Srivastava Shiv

Affiliation(s):  Department of Pathology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China; more

Corresponding email(s):   aliu301@yahoo.com.cn, ssrivastava@cpdr.org

Key Words:  Prostate cancer, NPY expression, Quantitative real-time reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)


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Liu Ai-jun, Furusato Bungo, Ravindranath Lakshmi, Chen Yong-mei, Srikantan Vasanta, Mcleod David G., Petrovics Gyorgy, Srivastava Shiv. Quantitative analysis of a panel of gene expression in prostate cancer—with emphasis on NPY expression analysis[J]. Journal of Zhejiang University Science B, 2007, 8(12): 853~859.

@article{title="Quantitative analysis of a panel of gene expression in prostate cancer—with emphasis on NPY expression analysis",
author="Liu Ai-jun, Furusato Bungo, Ravindranath Lakshmi, Chen Yong-mei, Srikantan Vasanta, Mcleod David G., Petrovics Gyorgy, Srivastava Shiv",
journal="Journal of Zhejiang University Science B",
volume="8",
number="12",
pages="853~859",
year="2007",
publisher="Zhejiang University Press & Springer",
doi="10.1631/jzus.2007.B0853"
}

%0 Journal Article
%T Quantitative analysis of a panel of gene expression in prostate cancer—with emphasis on NPY expression analysis
%A Liu Ai-jun
%A Furusato Bungo
%A Ravindranath Lakshmi
%A Chen Yong-mei
%A Srikantan Vasanta
%A Mcleod David G.
%A Petrovics Gyorgy
%A Srivastava Shiv
%J Journal of Zhejiang University SCIENCE B
%V 8
%N 12
%P 853~859
%@ 1673-1581
%D 2007
%I Zhejiang University Press & Springer
%DOI 10.1631/jzus.2007.B0853

TY - JOUR
T1 - Quantitative analysis of a panel of gene expression in prostate cancer—with emphasis on NPY expression analysis
A1 - Liu Ai-jun
A1 - Furusato Bungo
A1 - Ravindranath Lakshmi
A1 - Chen Yong-mei
A1 - Srikantan Vasanta
A1 - Mcleod David G.
A1 - Petrovics Gyorgy
A1 - Srivastava Shiv
J0 - Journal of Zhejiang University Science B
VL - 8
IS - 12
SP - 853
EP - 859
%@ 1673-1581
Y1 - 2007
PB - Zhejiang University Press & Springer
ER -
DOI - 10.1631/jzus.2007.B0853


Abstract: 
Objective: To investigate molecular alterations associating with prostate carcinoma progression and potentially provide information toward more accurate prognosis/diagnosis. Methods: A set of laser captured microdissected (LCM) specimens from 300 prostate cancer (PCa) patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) were defined. Ten patients representing “aggressive” PCa, and 10 representing “non-aggressive” PCa were selected based on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence, Gleason score, pathological stage and tumor cell differentiation, with matched patient age and race between the two groups. Normal and neoplastic prostate epithelial cells were collected with LCM from frozen tissue slides obtained from the RP specimens. The expressions of a panel of genes, including NPY, PTEN, AR, AMACR, DD3, and GSTP1, were measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (TaqMan), and correlation was analyzed with clinicopathological features. Results: The expressions of AMACR and DD3 were consistently up-regulated in cancer cells compared to benign prostate epithelial cells in all PCa patients, whereas GSTP1 expression was down regulated in each patient. NPY, PTEN and AR exhibited a striking difference in their expression patterns between aggressive and non-aggressive PCas (P=0.0203, 0.0284, and 0.0378, respectively, Wilcoxon rank sum test). The lower expression of NPY showed association with “aggressive” PCas based on a larger PCa patient cohort analysis (P=0.0037, univariate generalized linear model (GLM) analysis). Conclusion: Despite widely noted heterogeneous nature of PCa, gene expression alterations of AMACR, DD3, and GSTP1 in LCM-derived PCa epithelial cells suggest for common underlying mechanisms in the initiation of PCa. Lower NPY expression level is significantly associated with more aggressive clinical behavior of PCa; PTEN and AR may have potential in defining PCa with aggressive clinical behavior. Studies along these lines have potential to define PCa-associated gene expression alterations and likely co-regulation of genes/pathways critical in the biology of PCa onset/progression.

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